Making vesicles

I knew from quite early on that I wanted my ‘natural history’ diorama for the peptide/membrane project to feature several globe forms which inspired by the vesicles / cell membranes under the influence of the peptide. (The peptide itself would be invisible – only detectable in its effects).

The vesicles were not intended to be a scientific representation, but more something between an evocation and an abstract sculpture. Having said that, there were a number of concepts that I had found really interesting from the time I spent in the lab that I wanted to inform the development of the vesicle elements, so I set about playing with ideas and techniques that would take on those ideas.

Creating Surface: While I was in meetings and labs with the team, I kept hearing about phase separation. In fact, to begin with i wasn’t sure if i was hearing about ‘phase separation’ or ‘face separation’, but that was soon cleared up! During my time in the labs i looked at images and heard more about this phenomenon in cell membranes and was fascinated by the confocal microscope images that illustrated it.

‘Spotty’ vesicle showing phase separation – image captured by Andrew Booth

I started to play with frit balls as a way of creating different surface effects within pate de verre. Frit balls are small granules of glass which are heated in the kiln to contract into little balls. I started to incorporate different sizes of frit balls into pate de verre samples in different ways – mixed in or adhering to the surface in groups. It was fun and I got some effects i really liked.

Once I had settled on some textures i liked, i started making vesicles. Initially I used rough textured spheres around which to make moulds, but I then moved onto using wax spheres that were smoother and easier to work with.

Colours: The first vesicle I made, i mixed up my colours and ended up with a vesicle with big pink patches which i hated. The plan had been for a much more subtle transition from white to a pale fleshtone, not only to evoke the biological but also in keeping with the overall palette that i’d talked to the Leeds team about, having seen the space and the way colours worked in the CRF area. This first patchy vesicle made a good test piece to try out the effects I wanted to develop using perforation, poration and metal mesh.

Through further experimentation and refining my process I finally got the three colours and textures of vesicles that I wanted.

The three final vesicles before I started drilling

Drilling: I decided to make the perforations in the vesicles by drilling into the globes rather than making the holes through the mouldmaking. Several reasons for this, including the likely strength of the ultimate vesicles and also the accuracy of the holes. I did, however, for the darkest vesicle, identify where i wanted the perforations to fall and created bulges around them as part of the model and mouldmaking process. Luckily the drilling went well and there were no breakages at that stage, which would have been heart-breaking as well as vesicle-breaking, as by this point, each vesicle represents many hours of work. Now they have been drilled, the white vesicle has no pores, the pale flesh vesicle has small pores, and the larger darker vesicle has extensive perforations.

So that, in a nutshell, was the development of the vesicle elements of the pieces. There’ll be more vesicle chat when I get to posting about the process of making the mesh elements that emerge through the perforations to create the overall effect of leakage, inspired by the action of the peptide…

Thinking about texture, surface and edges

When I was initially thinking about my approach to the Peptides project, before my first visit to Leeds to present my pitch for the project, I was thinking very much about metaphors for the process by which the peptide acts on cell walls. Here are a couple of slides from my pitch, outlining my thoughts:

Since starting the project for real, I’ve returned to those slides and that thinking to see how it might guide my approach now I am actively creating samples to help me shape the work. From the conversations with Paul about how the peptide acts on the cell membrane, I keep coming back to the word perforate. I also keep visualising the process expressed in this image below, from one of the slides that Paul shared with me quite early in our discussions on my research visit in March.

From this, and from the previous images of vesicles and cells through the microscope, I am developing a series of samples with different textures and qualities. So far the samples are not perforated, but more ‘frayed’ at the edges (they are quite small) but I envisage that I will develop more punctured surfaces when I scale things up.

Punctured surfaces and interesting edges also give me scope for another idea that I am developing, of wrapping edges in aluminium mesh to mirrors the process suggested above where the peptide seems to ‘edge’ the emerging perforations in the membrane….

Using mesh to wrap the inside and edges of a form. The beginnings of an approach?

The image here was a first experiment, using a complete form that I had to hand, but I will be experimenting further with edging and wrapping.

Featured

Welcome to Glass Bodies

I am starting this blog at a strange time, with the world variously locked down in order to manage the spread of Coronavirus. Much of my art practice focuses on how we visualise health and disease in our bodies, often at a microscopic level. At present we are being bombarded with images with most news stories and programmes accompanied colourful and intricate representations of the virus, embellished to work well in the media environment. Implicitly or explicitly we are being invited to imagine the virus entering our own cells, with all that implies. If it weren’t all so grim, this would be a bonanza for an artist who is concerned with how we imagine disease at a cellular level.

Cell Portrait, Julie Light, 2018

But at the moment everything is, in fact, pretty grim, and I am hearing every day from friends and their families how badly affected they are by the virus or the measures in place to suppress it. So instead of dwelling on Coronavirus, just now I will be writing about the projects that I already have underway. And maybe I’ll come back to thinking about the visualisation of viruses in relation to my practice at a later date. (Who knows? At the moment, nothing is certain).

So, the two projects on my radar at the moment are also both about health and the body.

My main focus at present is a collaboration with researchers at Leeds University who are investigating the possibilities for using a membrane disrupting peptide to develop new cancer treatments. They have commissioned me to make an artwork inspired by their research which will take up residence at St James University Hospital in Leeds, ultimately in their new Clinical Research Facility. You’ll find most of my initial blogs are about how this project is developing, both in terms of learning some of the science from the very patient team in Leeds, to starting to make creative work.

My other project is at an earlier stage of development, although I have been thinking about it for longer. This is a project to create a body of artwork exploring the experience, incidence and implications of pressure ulcers. Incredibly prevalent, pressure ulcers are little talked about but have a fierce impact on those who experience them, and they can life-threatening to the elderly and vulnerable if their ulcers become severe.

Over the coming weeks and months, I shall be writing about my thoughts, research, creative exploration and development for these projects and maybe some others. I would love it if you would join me by subscribing, commenting, or just reading along and enjoying.