Creating and curating cabinets and vitrines

So, for those of you who have read my post on placing the artwork, you know that there are some major advantages to placing the artwork under glass (even if it is itself made of glass!).

I know that I don’t just want to make an artwork and pop it into a standard cabinet – often glass art does not fare well when placed inside a glass case. So my plan is to create an artwork where the cabinet or vitrine is an integral part of the piece.

When thinking about how to use cabinets or vitrines in this artwork, I am very much drawn to thinking about natural history exhibits. A lot of natural history museums in particular evolved complex settings for displaying their flora and fauna specimens in their vitrines during the late nineteenth century and enduring well into the twentieth century. This approach also spilled over into more general taxidermy.

Taxidermy display of Australian birds

Various artists are also known for using vitrines in their work. Here are examples from Carsten Holler, Anselm Kiefer, and an artist new to me Fiona Hall. They have used vitrines in different ways, creating types of taxonomy, mises en scenes and

Carsten Holler’s meditation on chanterelles and the colour orange.
Anselm Kiefer
Anselm Kiefer
Fiona Hall
Fiona Hall

Reviewing how curators, collectors and artists use of vitrines, some of the key things I know I want to think about going forward include:

  • Backdrop – coloured and or sandblasted
  • Drawing or writing on the case
  • Mise en scene inside the case – including narrative elements
  • Composition of main elements as specimens (or not)
  • Integrated lighting

I already have my eye on a specific vitrine / display case so am going to be thinking about those things in light of that….